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the situation with israel and hamas and the gaza strip. we will have that for you live. the conflict in israel and gaza came up today during prime minister's question time in london. >> can i start by going the prime minister in paying tribute to capt. area of the royal regiment of scotland? he showed the utmost courage and bravery and all of our thoughts and condolences are with his family and friends. can i also express my deep sorrow about the loss of life and suffering in israel and gaza in recent days, including the latest terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. there is widespread support on all sides of the house for immediate and durable ceasefire being agreed in israel and gaza. so what will the prime minister set out in his view what are the remaining barriers to this cease-fire agreement being reached? >> i agree with the gentlemen about the appalling news this morning about the terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. can i also express our concern for the people in southern israel and for the grave loss of life in gaza. i think all of us, across the european union, including also ame
independent state. israel has the right to live in peace and security with its neighbors. there is no substitute for negotiations. today's vote underscores the urgency of meaningful negotiations. we must give a do impetus to ensure an independent democratic state of palestine lives with a secure state of israel. i urge the parties to renew their commitment for negotiating peace. i count on all to act responsibly, preserve your treatment in state building under the leadership of president abbas and the prime minister. thank you. [applause] >> i think the secretary-general of the united nations for a statement. >> we will break away from the united nations where they have approved palestine f nineor nonmember status by a vote of 138 in favor. 41 countries abstained. i will take you now back to capitol hill. former congressional leaders and vice president joe biden will pay tribute to former new hampshire senator. he died november 19 at the age of 82. he was a key player in the budget negotiation for the 1980's and the ranking republican during the iran- contra hearings. dav
of the world are on the gaza strip for eight days. hamas rained rockets down on israel. the mullas shipped rockets to the sudan, sent them up into egypt before smuggling them in tunnels. israel responded by doing the only thing a responsible nation could do, it defended itself. now the united states needs to show there are consequences for attacking this sovereign nation, consequences for hamas and iran as well. we should have stricter enforcement of sanctions against iran. iran and hamas both need to be held accountable for these attacks. israel are the moral right and legal duty to defend itself from the barbarians, hamas. there is a cease-fire but only until hamas obtains more iranian missiles. hamas is the puppet and iran is the police departmentetteeer. the iranian regime need to go. the iranian people need to do away with the little guy in the desert, ahmadinejad. and that's the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the house will be in order. further requests for nute speeches? are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the gent
and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti- israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are going to be much greater. they are leaving an impression there is something unfair. this is the time you need correspondents who have spent years in the region, because by and large, you ask what i think of the coverage. i think it is surface. it focuses on the casualties. you do not know what the possibilities may be for agreement on the sides. i think that is one thing we hav
development in israel and gaza. tomorrow we will discuss party in the united states. after that, the executive director for the national congress of american indians explains with the fiscal cliff and native americans and the alaskan native communities. plus, e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. >> there are many people who might even take issue with great saving the union during the civil war. did it lincoln did that? he did. i will not a grant is the only person to save the union, but he was the commanding general of the army that would think the policy to affect, and he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia under robert e. lee that ended the war. if anybody won the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you cannot, but one of the things we do when history is we generalize, simplify, because history reality is simply too complicated to get our heads are around if we deal with it in the full complexity. granted save the union during the civil war, and i do contend he same award during reconstruction as well. -- he sav
what scenarios you would put on the table? and are you concerned about israel? >> israel's interesting because israel has a lot at stake but israel is also an independent decisionmaker. and they have their own interests in this and they have made it clear that they are not prepared to accept without some kind of military action iran with a clear path to nuclear weapon. so in some sense it will force us to pay attention to this issue, which we should. there are a lot of options. i think what we need to think about are not options but scenarios. one scenario would be for the administration to reengage with the iranians diplomatically, with the other countries involved, so-called p-5, 5 permanent members of the security council plus germany to make a fairly robust offer to the iranians of the kinds of things available to the iranian people of the regimes to give up this nuclear program and test them and to see if there is a diplomatic outcome. it's acceptable. if there isn't i think the process will be important in order for the administration to set up whatever options might follow the f
by -- met by some tough language from the security council. not from the government, israel or anyone. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that expe
. israel bombarded the gaza strip with more than 180 airstrikes today. the king of jordan has canceled a visit to britain under the protest there. "the new york times" reporting the pentagon says it could take more than 45,000 troops to contain them. i cannot remember a time of more moving parts in the middle east puzzle than right now on this day. so much is new, and they are all inter-connected. hamas is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our
this panel is syria. but what is happening in israel as we gather here this week? these are the questions of our time. these are the challenges of our generation and. that, i think, is one of the great benefits of opportunities like halifax, to have a very in- depth discussion on how we got as a community -- a community of democracies, a community of countries that care, are compassionate, and are able to do something to stop the slaughter of innocent civilians. >> there were many who say we need to have more young emerging democracies that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our c
biased israel view. i can tell you what is going on. i love president assad. i stand with them. there has always been peace there. the women wear jeans, they'd drive, they vote. it is more of a democracy and a lot of ways and here. host: what do you think policy should be regarding syria? 5000 people killed in the uprising. caller: those rebels are not syrian. they were planted there. it is really funny. when obama put troops into israel, i think he did all of this for reelection. i am relieved mitt romney did not get elected even though i did not vote for either. i think obama might do the right thing and cut ties with israel. host: we will go to a report actually on syrian president assad. this in "usa today." he said "i am not a puppet." we have a few minutes left on the first segment of "the washington journal." we will go to pete in rhode island on the democrat line. caller: good morning. i would like to see him focus on the economy. host: specifically what part? caller: let's go with the fiscal cliff coming up. my thoughts were my belief is, and i hope somebody calls and corrects me
the war in syria, the conflict between israel and the palestinians, and the destabilizing threat from iran and every time and overtime we also must address the religious, economic and cultural differences that create tension and that are exploited by extremists. still, as our country emerges from a decade of large-scale conflict and confronts new fiscal constraints at home, i, frankly, worry that our political system will prevent us from making the investments in diplomacy and development that we need to ensure we protect america's interests in these volatile regions of the world. these investments unfortunately lack a constituency in the congress at a time of great fiscal pressure. indeed, we face the process of budget sequestration that would be devastating to national security, not just because what have it does to our national defense, but also for what it does to these programs that support diplomacy and enhance our quality of life. our men and women in uniform know too well what sacrifice is all about for the sake of our nation. for more than a decade after we were attacked on septem
, as will the head of the d triple c, chairman johns for the house races, steve israel of new york, news conference coming at 2:00 eastern. we'll likely have it for you here on c-span as the house is expected to gavel out quickly at 2:00. >> what i like about c-span's coverage is it's in-depth. oftentimes you'll cover an event from start to finish, and i can get the information that i need. i like to watch the communicators, i like to watch congressional hearings. the events that you do at the national press club where there are policy leaders speaking. i find those useful. >> howard woolley watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. the lame duck session starts at 2:00 p.m. eastern. until then part of this morning's "washington journal." host: we are back with the former senator from indiana served as democrat for that state from 1999 to 2011. now co-founder of the no labels organization. senator bayh, let me begin with the petraeus resignation. what's your reaction? you served on the intelligence
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12